Egg Egg Egg Egg Egg Egg Trout Trout 2012 Introduction 2012
  • Where NYC Water Comes From

    Rain that falls on the Catskill Mountains upstate flows into reservoirs where it is collected. There are trees around the reservoirs to keep dirt out, and water goes through filters, and they add alum to make the dirt sink to the bottom. From there it flows through an aqueduct 80 miles long to the Gatehouse, where chlorine and fluoride are added. From there it goes through water tunnels 400 feet underground, then to water mains and pipes that go to our homes. Gravity makes the water flow the whole way, and there is enough water pressure to make the water go up to the top of a 6-story building without a pump. That’s why many NYC buildings are 6 stories high!

    Continue with the Slideshow »

  • Collaborative Water Supply Drawings

    Students work together to draw the entire NYC water supply system, from Catskill Mountain Watershed to NYC apartment buildings.

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • NYC Water Supply Drawings

    Students work together to make drawings that show the entire NYC water supply system - from the Catskill Mountain Watershed to NYC buildings.

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • Where Does the Mysterious NYC Water Come From? by Elko

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • Where Our Water Comes From, and Where Our Water Goes, by Isabel

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • NYC Water Supply System, by Maia

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • NYC Water Supply System, by Nora and Maya

    See larger image (opens new window)

  • Wastewater Management

    "When you are finished using water at home, it goes down the drain, to the underground sewer pipes, and to the wastewater treatment plant. They spin the wastewater to separate the water from the sludge. They put good bacteria in to eat the bad bacteria, and all this stuff sinks to the bottom. Then they take the “clean” water off the top, add a little chlorine, and release it into the Hudson River and the East River.

    Not all the wastewater treatment plants can process sludge, so there are boats (called "Sludge Boats") that take the sludge across the East River to plants that can process it. There, they torch the sludge in an oven, which releases methane gas that they use to make electricity to power the wastewater treatment plant. After it is cooked, the sludge turns into fertilizer that goes to golf courses and orange groves.

    When there are huge rainstorms, there is too much water going through the sewers for the treatment plants to handle. When this happens, raw sewage goes into the Hudson River and the East River. To solve this problem, the DEP is making big storage tanks to hold the 2.5 million gallons of wastewater, and a few days later they release it into the treatment plant."

    Continue with the Slideshow »

  • Wastewater Journey, by Keira

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • Where Does Our Wastewater Go? by Maxwell

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • Clean Water vs. Dirty Water Part I, by Josie

    See larger image (opens new window)

    Next »

  • Clean Water vs. Dirty Water Part II, by Josie

    See larger image (opens new window)

Thanks to The Catskill Watershed Corporation for their generous financial support, which made this study possible. Thanks to the DEP Education Department for the information about the wastewater treatment system. Thanks to The Target Foundation for helping to fund the fishing trip at South Street Seaport Museum. We also thank Bank Street College of Education’s Tiorati Workshop and Con Edison for supporting environmental studies for 1st and 2nd graders. And thanks to TNS parent Dyske Suematsu for volunteering to create this mini-site.